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Blog by Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, Chiropractor & Acupuncture Provider in Woodbridge, Ontario


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Global News

TORONTO – Doctors may be ordering unnecessary MRI tests for patients feeling lower back pain, a new Canadian study says.

More than half of lower-back MRIs requested in two hospitals – one in Calgary and one in Ottawa – didn’t offer much value to patients, according to the study published Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

“It is commonly believed that MRI is overused and this is the first time its use has been rigorously measured,” said Dr. Derek Emery, a neuroradiologist and researcher at the University of Alberta.

“For the lower back, imaging is most often not useful,” Emery told Global News.

Emery and his team collaborated with the universities of Calgary, Toronto and Ottawa in the study.

Read more:By the numbers: Hospital wait times

An MRI – or magnetic resonance imaging – is a medical imaging technique that produces images of the internal body to help…

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Politeus


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Pain at the Back of My Knee…The Popliteus Syndrome

PoliteusToday, my chiropractic health assistant and I are writing about a rare and often misdiagnosed condition associated with the knee joint. There are various knee conditions such as ACL, PCL, Meniscus irritation, and Patellofemoral arthralgia that get diagnosed correctly. However, at times a simple strain injury to the muscles at the back of the knee goes undetected.

Just the other day, a 30 year old runner came to the clinic complaining of posterior (back of the knee) pain. The knee pain started after he ran 5km over the weekend. The patient went to his medical doctor and his doctor indicated to rest and ice the knee. The medical doctor referred the patient to me for further physical investigation.

We tested the knee for any Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL), Medical/Lateral Collateral Ligament, and menisci damage. All the tests were negative. The patient explained that he felt the pain most when we touched the back area of the knee (mushy area) while in a flexed position. The patient also explained that he felt pain while we tested his knee flexion. We quickly understood the cause of his pain. This rare condition is called Popliteus Syndrome or Popliteus Strain.

The Popliteus muscle is responsible for internal rotation of the shin bone (tibia) as well as for unlocking the knee joint when bending the knee from a fully straightened position (extended position). The popliteus muscle originates from outside surface of the knee and goes on to attach to the back aspect of the inside area below the knee joint.

This muscle is often injured through acute injury (sport injuries, car accident or fall) or overuse.

Acute injuries to the popliteus occur after a significant force to the knee. They are common in road traffic accidents or falls where the knee is extended. Popliteus injuries may occur in association with other knee injuries occurring to the ACL, PCL, Meniscus and Collateral ligament. Thus, it is important to screen for this muscle injury at all times and especially in the presence of other knee injuries.

Overuse injuries to the popliteus muscle develop gradually and are most common in runners. They tend to be due to biomechanical issues (foot issues) and tight hamstring muscles, quadriceps and calf muscles. We explained this to our patient.

We went forward by treating the patients knee joint. We started with therapeutic ultrasound, laser therapy and electrotherapy to the posterior/back area of the knee. Following this, we proceeded with soft tissue therapy to the popliteus and stretched the calfs, hamstrings and quadriceps. The patient returned the next day for a second treatment. After the second treatment, the patient explained that he was much better and did not experience any more locking/pain in the knee joint. The patient went back into training in a progressive fashion (1km added to each day without pain). We made sure that the patient followed proper warm up and stretching instructions in order to prevent the injury from reoccurring. Two weeks following the injury, the patient returned to explain that he ran 5km with no issues.

As one can see, it can be easy to ignore this muscle especially with the other knee areas/injuries/concerns.  It is critical to always evaluate all the musculature in the knee area in order to avoid missing this often under/misdiagnosed injury.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is my personal notes about this subject matter. It is intended for informational purposes only. Consult a health practitioner to help you diagnose and treat injuries of any kind.

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC

Chiropractor in Woodbridge, Ontario

www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

—–

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Woodbridge, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, please comment and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns. To book an appointment, simply contact us via email or visit our website for phone information (www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com).

10395 Weston Road, Building A. Woodbridge, Ontario. L4H-3T4

Tennis Elbow


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Tennis Elbow vs. Golfers Elbow

Let’s first start with a few Case Studies:

1) 45 Year Old Female

Pain on the outside of the elbow due to twisting/closing jam jars over the weekend.  Pain is localized to the outside of the elbow.  Patient is complaining of progressive pain.

2) 50 Year Old Male

Pain on the inside of the elbow after playing a bocce (lawn bowling).  Patient explains that extending the wrist is painful.  Patient finds it difficult to use his wrist due to the progressive pain found along the inside of his elbow.

Answers found below.

Many patients have been presenting and asking me about these two conditions (tennis elbow and golfers elbow) and how they differ.   Okay, so let us break them down into very simple terms.

1) Both conditions occur at the elbow.

2) Tennis Elbow occurs on the outside of the elbow.

3) Golfers Elbow occurs on the inside of the elbow.

Now that we have these simple concepts in place, let us explore the anatomy of the elbow joint and structures surrounding the joint.

Anatomy of the Elbow

Elbow Joint

Elbow Joint

The human elbow consists of 3 bones and 3 articulations. The three bones are the humerus (arm bone), ulna and radius (forearm bones – remember the radius is on the thumb side and the ulna is  on the 5th finger side WHEN the hand is in a position where the palm is facing upwards).   The humerus attaches to the ulna – the humeroulnar articulation and the humeroradial articulation (the articulation between the humerus and the radius).  The third is a pivot-type joint with articulation between the head of the radius and the radial notch of the ulna (the two forearm bones).  Surrounding these joints are a number of muscles, ligaments, fascia and arteries/nerves.  The muscles of the forearm are responsible for turning the arm as if you are using a screw driver as well as flexing/extending the wrist.

What is Tennis Elbow?

Tennis elbow also known as lateral epicondylitis is a condition that affects the muscle on the outside of the elbow.

Tennis elbow is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse or repetitive strain (partial tearing of muscle fibers in the elbow) .  Playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause this condition.  However, it is also important to note that other sports like golf, or activities that involve moving your wrists/elbow joint can aggravate the elbow (Golfers, baseball players, bowlers, gardeners or landscapers, house or office cleaners (because of vacuuming, sweeping, and scrubbing), carpenters, mechanics, and assembly line workers).

Tennis Elbow Pain

Tennis Elbow Pain

Symptoms of tennis elbow include:

  • Pain slowly increasing around the outside of the elbow.
  • Pain is worse when shaking hands or squeezing objects (flexion of the wrist).
  • Pain is made worse by stabilizing or moving the wrist with force.
  • Examples which aggravate pain include lifting, using tools, opening jars, or even handling simple utensils such as a knife, fork or toothbrush.

Tennis elbow affects 1% to 3% of the population.  Interestingly, less than 5% of all tennis elbow diagnoses are related to actually playing tennis!!! Tennis elbow affects men more than women. It most often affects people between the ages of 30 and 50.

What is Golfer’s Elbow?

Golfer’s elbow also known as medial epicondylitis causes pain and inflammation in the tendons that connect the forearm to the elbow. The pain is on the inside aspect of the elbow (area the rests beside the torso when your arms are down).

Golfer's Elbow Support

Golfer’s Elbow Support

Golfer’s elbow is caused by overusing or straining the muscles in the forearm that allow you to do the following motions – grip, rotate your arm, and flex your wrist. Continuous or repetitive flexing, gripping, or swinging can cause pulls or tiny tears in the tendons.

This condition doesn’t just affect golfers. Those who do activities with repetitive hand, wrist, or forearm motions can lead to golfer’s elbow.  Furthermore, sports include tennis, bowling, and baseball can cause the same symptoms.

Tennis and Golfer’s Elbow are not that different!

Yes, Tennis and Golfer’s elbow are not that different.  In other words, they are very similar types of strains or tendon aggravation (tendonosis) conditions.   One occurs on the inside of the elbow (golfer’s elbow) and the other on the outside of the elbow (tennis elbow).

SO now that I understand the difference, how to I treat these conditions?

At our clinic, we provide patients with a variety of both active and passive treatments.  Passively, chiropractic care, acupuncture, soft tissue therapy, mobilizations, electrotherapy, ultrasound and laser therapy are effective.  Actively, eccentric elbow exercises work well.  An exercise is eccentric when a muscle contraction lengthens the muscle, rather than shortens it. The opposite is called concentric exercises.

Furthermore, some individuals do well with golf and tennis elbow supports.  These are fairly inexpensive and assist with controlling some of the discomfort experienced at the elbow (see image to the right).

Back to the Case Studies

1) 45 Year Old Female

Pain on the outside area of the elbow.  Patient was closing a number of jam jars over the weekend.  Pain is becoming progressively worse.  No shooting pain down the arm, only localized pain in the elbow.  What can it be?

Yes, this is a case of TENNIS ELBOW!

-Pain localized to the outside area of the elbow and mechanism of injury is closing jam jars (twisting wrist and using the extensor muscles in the forearm).

2) 50 Year Old Male

Pain on the inside of the elbow after playing a bocce (lawn bowling).  Patient explains that extending the wrist is painful.  Patient finds it difficult to use his wrist due to the progressive pain found along the inside of his elbow.

-Pain localized to the inside area of the elbow and mechanism of injury is using the flexors of

YES, this is a case of GOLFERS ELBOW!

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is my personal notes about this subject matter. It is intended for informational purposes only. Consult a health practitioner to help you diagnose and treat injuries of any kind.

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC

Chiropractor in Woodbridge, Ontario

www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

—–

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Woodbridge, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, please comment and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns.

10395 Weston Road, Building A

Woodbridge, Ont

L4H-3T4

Step Defect


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The Weight Lifter Problem: AC Joint Separations

Patient: Male 35 Years of Age 

I recently had a patient come see me in regards to shoulder pain.   While bench pressing the patient felt a pull in his left shoulder.  Not knowing what it was, he stopped exercising and took a break.  He is in his mid 30’s and physically active.  X-ray and Ultrasound came back unremarkable.   No swelling in the shoulder.  Only pain when reaching overhead and when bringing his arm across his body (adduction movement).  What is happening, he asked? What would cause this type of shoulder pain, decreased motion and weakness.

Let’s talk about shoulder anatomy for a moment

Our shoulder region is made up of the arm bone (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula), and collarbone (clavicle) – see images below.   The humerus attaches into the scapula.  Furthermore, the scapula has a protruding bony area at the top of the arm bone called the acromion.  The acromion attaches to the collarbone or clavicle.  This joint or connection is known as the acromioclavicular joint (AC Joint).  The AC joint is held together by various ligaments.  Ligaments are soft tissues which connect bone to bone. The ligament between the acromion and clavicle is called the acromioclavicular ligament.  Furthermore, you have two other ligaments which hold the clavicle down on the scapula.  These are known as the coracoid-acromion ligament and coraco-clavicular ligament.  Surrounding the bones and ligaments are muscles.  The rotator cuff muscles are responsible for most movements in the shoulder.  They help us to raise our arm over head, comb our hair and open a door.

Shoulder Joint

Shoulder Joint

AC Joint

AC Joint

What is the purpose of the AC Joint? 

The AC joint allows the ability to raise the arm above the head. This joint functions as a pivot point, acting to help with movement of the scapula resulting in a greater degree of arm movement.

How do the ligaments surrounding the shoulder sprain or tear? 

The ligaments of the shoulder sprain or tear most commonly is one falls on an outstretched arm, falls on their shoulder or endures a sport injury (football, weightlifting, rugby, etc.).

How are AC Joints Graded? 

AC joint separations are graded from mild to severe. The grading depends on which ligaments are sprained or torn. The mild type, grade 1, is a simple sprain of the AC ligaments.  A grade two AC separation involves a tearing of the AC ligaments and a sprain of the coracoclavicular ligaments. A complete tear of the AC ligaments and the coracoclavicular ligaments is a grade three AC separation. This injury results in the bump on the shoulder which is known as a step defect.

Let us recap the grading of an AC joint injury:

Step Defect

Step Defect

  • Grade 1 is a simple sprain to the AC joint
  • Grade 2 involves rupture of the AC ligament
  • Grade 3 rupture of both AC and CC ligaments which often results in a superior displacement.
  • Grade 4 involves posterior displacement (movement backwards)
  • Grade 5 superior (upwards) displacement, to a greater degree than grade 3, with an increase in coracoclavicular space by 3-5 times normal
  • Grade 6 involves full rupture of both AC and CC ligaments with the clavicle being displaced downwards.

How do I treat an AC joint dislocation? 

Ice, graston therapy, soft tissue therapy, taping techniques, exercises/rehabilitation as well as laser therapy helps to heal the A/C joint area.  Grades 4-6 may require surgical intervention.  If this injury is neglected and allowed to heal out of place this could increase the wear and tear on your joint causing you problems in the future.  Make sure you seek medical attention, if you experience this injury.

What else can this injury be? 

It is important to rule out other conditions, such as SLAP lesions (labrum injuries), shoulder impingement, tendonosis and/or tears.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is my personal notes about this subject matter. It is intended for informational purposes only. Consult a health practitioner to help you diagnose and treat injuries of any kind.

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC

Chiropractor in Woodbridge, Ontario

www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

—–

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, please comment and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns.

Woodbridge Chiropractor


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Fit for Life Wellness and Rehabilitation Centre: NOW OPEN, November 2012 – Dr. Luciano Di Loreto

 

Woodbridge Chiropractor

Woodbridge Chiropractor

Dear Friends:

I am ecstatic to announce that we are opened to serve you! 

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is ready!  We are located within the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic.  After months of preparation, the clinic looks fantastic.  Our 5000 square foot Medical Centre has over 20 treatment rooms and is conveniently located off Highway #400, just North of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Corner of Weston Road & Canada Drive).   

The Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic is broken down into 3 areas: Wellness/Rehab, Medical & Pharmacy. On the Wellness side, we have Chiropractic, Foot care (Chiropodist), Holistic Nutrition, Reiki, and Personal Training services.  In the near future, we will be providing Registered Massage Therapy.  On the Medical side, we have two family doctors accepting family patients as well as a Walk-In Clinic.  In the near future, a Cardiologist, Internist, and Ultrasound Diagnostic Centre will be added to the Medical team.  The Vellore Medical Centre also has an in-house Pharmacy.  Yes, we are truly a one stop shop!

If you are in the Woodbridge area, please drop by to say hello.  I would be more than happy to take you on a tour of the facility. 

Look forward to seeing you soon,

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC.

Chiropractor & Acupuncture Provider

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre

(Located Within Vellore Medical Centre)

10395 Weston Road, Building A

Woodbridge, ONT

L4H-3T4

Wellness Phone: 647.873.4490

Medical Phone: 905.832.4490

Website: www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

Blog: drlucianodiloreto.wordpress.com

Sciatica


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Pain in the Butt! How to Overcome Piriformis Syndrome…often confused as Sciatica!

Yesterday, I discussed a “pain in the butt” condition and no it was not tax pain (for those that have seen the H&R Block commercials).   The blog was actually about the discomfort of a condition known as coccydynia.   Today, I am going to write about a “pain in the butt” condition known as piriformis syndrome.  I see this particular condition very often!

Case Study:

A 34 Year old man has a stabbing pain in the buttock with a sharp electrical feeling going down the back of his leg (sciatica).  He felt this immediately after exiting his pick up truck after a long day at work.

Have you ever felt or heard of this condition before?  Most people have heard of someone who has experienced these particular symptoms.  First off, sciatica (as a symptom of pain going down the back of the leg) is very common and so is pain near the lower back/buttock region.

It is Time to Review Our Anatomy

I know, I know – you do not like this part of my blogs.  It is crucial, however, that we understand where we are talking about and the specific structures in the area, if we are to understand what this condition is all about.

Piriformis Anatomy

Piriformis Anatomy

As you can see to the right, the piriformis muscle attaches from the hip (greater trochanter) to the vertebral column (the sacrum to be specific – the triangular bone at the base of the spine).  The connection of the sacrum to the pelvis bones forms the sacroiliac joint.  We have two of these joints – both left and right.T he piriformis muscle is one of the external rotators of the hip and leg.  What is an external rotator you ask? An external rotator is a muscle that helps turn the foot and leg outward.  As you may notice in the image to the right, there is a yellow string under the piriformis muscle belly.  This string is actually the sciatic nerve.  In 80% of individuals, the sciatic nerve runs below the muscle.  In 5-10% it runs above the muscle and in 10-15% it pierces through the muscle belly (especially if someone is born with two piriformis muscle bellies).  The piriformis muscle can squeeze and irritate the sciatic nerve in this area, leading to the symptoms of sciatica (pain going down the back of the leg).What Causes Piriformis Syndrome?

As indicated above, the piriformis muscle can irritate and squeeze the sciatic nerve, which causes a variety of symptoms going down the back of the leg.  But how and why does piriformis become tight?  Well, sometimes it is due too sacroiliac joint dysfunction.  The sacrum and the pelvis bones create a sacroiliac joint on both the left and right side.  This joints provided slight movement, but act move as a shock absorber or force dampener. If the sacroiliac joint becomes tight on one side it may lead to disruptions on how the muscles in the area function – thus resulting in tightened and irritated muscles and nerves.   Furthermore, piriformis syndrome may also come about, as a result of  an injury such as a fall onto the buttock.  If bleeding in and around the piriformis muscle occur it will form a hematoma.  Thus, the piriformis muscle begins to swell and put pressure on the sciatic nerve. Soon the hematoma dissolves, but the muscle goes into spasm and affects the surrounding joint and muscle structures.  Usually, I find piriformis syndrome one either the left or the right side, but not both at the same time.

I think I have Piriformis Syndrome, now what?

In order to diagnosis piriformis syndrome, a number of physical orthopaedic exam tests need to be performed.  Resisted external rotation of the hip as well as passively turning the leg inward, will create symptoms.  Direct 

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(feeling the muscle) will also elicit symptoms and may refer pain down the back of the leg.  Predisposition to piriformis syndrome may be an anatomically short leg, pronation at the feet, or pelvic rotation.

How do I reverse these Piriformis Syndrome symptoms?

Stretching techniques or soft tissue therapy techniques (massage with a stretch) really help.  Furthermore, I find that acupuncture, chiropractic, electrotherapy, heat therapy and laser therapy also help!  In my practice, I use a variety of stretches (difficult to perform on your own).   These stretches really help to loosen the piriformis area.  I find that a combination of a variety of treatments often does the trick!  Usually within four to six treatments, a patient is walking better, has less pain travelling down the back of the leg and does not feel spasm in the buttock.  I always find that massage therapy in conjunction with chiropractic care really helps when it comes to piriformis syndrome.  Massage therapist are excellent has relaxing tight muscles and chiropractor can work on relaxing the joint (via a chiropractic adjustment).

I hope you enjoyed this pain in the butt blog today.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is my personal notes about this subject matter. It is intended for informational purposes only. Consult a health practitioner to help you diagnose and treat injuries of any kind.

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC

Chiropractor in Woodbridge, Ontario

www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

—–

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, please comment and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns.

Butt Pain


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Tailbone Pain…Ouch! What Treatments are available for Coccydynia?

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Painful Tailbone!  OUCH!  What Treatment Options are Available for Coccydynia?

I have a patient who fell on her buttock while walking down the stairs.   Immediately, she felt a sharp and bruising pain in the buttock.  sacrum coccyx The next day she went to her family doctor who explained that her tailbone was inflamed – he called this condition coccydynia NOT tax pain (for those that have seen the H&R block commercials).  She asked me what treatment methods would help her coccydynia.  She explained that she wanted to not only decrease pain, but also fix the problem.

Before we discuss treatment options for coccydynia, let us discuss the anatomy/location of the tailbone.

Where is the Tailbone Located Anatomically?

The tailbone is located in the lower buttock.  Follow your spine all the way down and it is the final segment in the vertebral column.  Interestingly, the coccyx is a remnant tail!  The coccyx is usually formed of four rudimentary vertebrae (sometimes five or three).  It articulates above with the sacrum. Here is a picture of the coccyx attached to the sacrum above.

What is Coccydynia?

Coccydynia is associated with pain and tenderness at the tip of the tailbone – between the buttocks. The pain is often worsened by sitting on a hard surface.  Symptoms include:

  • Pain that is worse when sitting
  • Local pain in the tailbone area that is worse when touched or when any pressure is placed on it
  • Pain that is worse when moving from a sitting to standing position
  • Pain that is worse with constipation and feels better after a bowel movement

What causes Coccydynia?

Coccydynia can be caused by various factors.  For instance, coccydynia is often caused by an injury (fall on ice or on a hard surface), but it may occur seemingly spontaneously. Conditions which mimic coccydynia, include sciatica, infection, cysts, and fractured bones.  When the tailbone does break due to trauma such as a fall, it usually protrudes forward towards the front of the body – thus causing much discomfort.

How is Coccydynia Treated?

Patients with coccydynia are advised to use a well-padded  seat when sitting and avoid long periods of sitting.

Furthermore, the following treatment methods can help.  Rest, avoiding re-injury to the affected area, using an anti-inflammation cream and/or pain medications can help to relieve symptoms. Some patients with persistent coccydynia are treated with local cortisone injection. Rarely, when patients have unrelenting pain, a surgical resection of the coccyx can be performed to remove the irritated bony prominence.

Now let’s get back to my patient…

Amazingly, acupuncture helped my patient!  Four treatments of acupuncture and the pain was completely resolved.  The treatments were provided every other day and lasted approximately 30 minutes each.  The acupuncture needles were inserted around the sacrum on both sides.  Electrical stimulation was added to the surrounding area.  Furthermore, ice therapy also helps to reduce pain, swelling and inflammation in the area.  Laser therapy is also a treatment modality in which I have had success with.  Laser therapy has been known to assist in soft tissue healing.

All in all, coccydynia is poorly understand.  It is not too common, however, does occur.  Over the last few years, I have seen about eight to ten patients with this particular condition.  100% of these individuals fell on their buttock and immediately felt the buttock pain.  If you are unsure if you have this condition, make sure you go see your health practitioner.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is my personal notes about this subject matter. It is intended for informational purposes only. Consult a health practitioner to help you diagnose and treat injuries of any kind.

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., DC

Chiropractor in Woodbridge, Ontario

www.fitforlifewellnessclinic.com

—–

Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, please comment and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns.